Low muscle strength linked to premature death, says study

Individuals with weaker muscles do not typically live as long as their stronger peers, and are 50 per cent more likely to die earlier, finds a study.

According to researchers, muscle strength may be an even more important predictor of overall health and longevity than muscle mass.

In addition, hand grip strength specifically has been found to be inversely related to mobility limitations and disability.

However, despite being a relatively simple and cost-effective test, grip strength measurement is not currently part of most routine physicals, they said.

“Maintaining muscle strength throughout life-and especially in later life-is extremely important for longevity and ageing independently,” said lead researcher Kate Duchowny, post-doctoral student at the University of California-San Francisco.

The study, published in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, highlights the importance of integrating grip strength measurements into routine care-not just for older adults but even in midlife.

“Having hand grip strength be an integral part of routine care would allow for earlier interventions, which could lead to increased longevity and independence for individuals,” Duchowny said.

For the study, the team analysed data of 8,326 men and women, aged 65 and older.

After adjusting for socio-demographic factors, chronic health conditions and smoking history, the results showed that people with low muscle strength are 50 per cent more likely to die earlier.

[“source=indiatvnews”]

5 healthy diet mistakes that hamper weight loss

Diet,Nutrition,Weight loss

Aiming to lose weight? According to a study, choosing the wrong meal (no matter the quantity) can leave you craving for more. When it comes to crushing hunger, it’s not about when you eat; it’s about what you eat. If you want to lose weight, curb your appetite by avoiding the foods that make you more hungry.

Kathleen Alleaume, a nutritionist and an exercise scientist, has listed a number of eatables that are to be avoided while on a diet:

Salty snacks: Snacks preserved with sodium are generally highly refined, without filling you up. A study shows that added salt makes people eat more. Besides, all that sodium leaves you thirsty.

Salads: Salads are the epitome of diet-friendly lunches but if your salad is all kale, cucumber, and spinach, chances are that you’re not getting enough satisfying sustenance to keep you going until dinner. Adding a topping of protein (boiled eggs, chicken, salmon, or legumes), with slow-burning carbs (like roasted sweet potato, corn or brown rice) and a little fat (feta, nuts, seeds, tahini or avocado) can help settle those hunger pangs.

Rice crackers: Rice crackers contain small traces of fibre and are made from highly refined rice that make our insulin levels spike, causing blood sugar to crash, making us feel hungry again, even if we have just eaten.

Juices: Juice cleansing has become a popular way to lose weight fast, and while you will be sipping on antioxidant-rich and hydrating elixir, the lack of fibre means your body absorbs the calories quicker. Stay full while chewing your calories instead, so the brain receives hunger-combating cues that help you get from meal to meal.

Alcohol: Research has shown that alcohol flicks the brain into starvation mode. This increases appetite and explains why we reach for snacks after a night on the town. What’s more, alcohol calories can’t be stored in the body, so the only way you can dispose of alcohol is to metabolise it for energy. So avoid binge drinking if you want to avoid binge eating.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Humans could have been long-distance runners, if we had this gene

Long Distance Running,Running,Gene Responsible For Running

The functional loss of a single gene may have helped humans become one of the best long-distance runners in the animal kingdom, a study has found.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego in the US studied mice engineered to lack the gene called CMAH. Two to three million years ago, the functional loss of CMAH triggered significant changes in what would eventually become the modern human species, altering everything from fertility rates to increasing cancer risk from eating red meat, researchers said.

The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggests that the lost gene may have contributed to humanity’s well-documented claim to be among the best long-distance runners in the animal kingdom.

At roughly the same time as the CMAH mutation took hold, human ancestors were transitioning from forest dwellers to life primarily upon the arid savannahs of Africa.

While they were already walking upright, the bodies and abilities of these early hominids were evolving dramatically, researchers said.

Major changes in skeletal biomechanics and physiology resulted in long, springy legs, big feet, powerful gluteal muscles and an expansive system of sweat glands able to dissipate heat much more effectively than other larger mammals, they said.

Such changes, scientists say, helped fuel the emergence of the human ability to run long distances relatively tirelessly. This allowed our ancestors to hunt in the heat of the day when other carnivores were resting and to pursue prey to their point of exhaustion, a technique called persistence hunting, they said.

“We discovered this first clear genetic difference between humans and our closest living evolutionary relatives, the chimpanzees, more than 20 years ago,” said Ajit Varki, a professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine. Researchers investigated how the genetic difference might have contributed to the origin of Homo, the genus that includes modern Homo sapiens and extinct species like Homo habilis and Homo erectus.

“We evaluated the exercise capacity (of mice lacking the CMAH gene), and noted an increased performance during treadmill testing and after 15 days of voluntary wheel running,” said graduate student Jon Okerblom. Ellen Breen, a research scientist at the UC San Diego, observed that the mice displayed greater resistance to fatigue, increased mitochondrial respiration and hind-limb muscle, with more capillaries to increase blood and oxygen supply.

Varki said the data suggest CMAH loss contributed to improved skeletal muscle capacity for oxygen utilisation. “And if the findings translate to humans, they may have provided early hominids with a selective advantage in their move from trees to becoming permanent hunter-gatherers on the open range,” he said.

When the CMAH gene mutated in the genus Homo two to three million years ago, perhaps in response to evolutionary pressures caused by an ancient pathogen, it altered how subsequent hominids and modern humans used sialic acids.

It is a family of sugar molecules that coat the surfaces of all animal cells, where they serve as vital contact points for interaction with other cells and with the surrounding environment. Varki and other resaerchers have linked the loss of the CMAH gene and sialic acids to not just improved long-distance running ability, but also enhanced innate immunity in early hominids.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Huawei nova 4 with in-screen selfie camera to arrive on December 17

Remember the Huawei teaser from last Monday with a shooting star in the upper left corner? The company cleared any confusion today, relaunching the same teaser, but with a camera instead of a light dot, revealing this will be the Huawei nova 4, and it will arrive on December 17.

Huawei nova 4 teaser
Huawei nova 4 teaser

The phone was already spotted in the wild in a pre-production case with its unusual selfie camera in the upper left corner. Given Samsung is yet to announce a launch date for the Galaxy A8s, Huawei looks set to become the first company to introduce a phone with the unusual solution.

Huawei nova 3 arrived in July with a Kirin 970 chipset, while the nova 2s sported a Kirin 960 platform. This leads to the assumption the new device will have the latest SoC – Kirin 980, because if it sticks to the midranger Kirin 710, it might be as powerful as the affordable nova 3i, and that would be an utter disappointment.

[“source=gsmarena”]