Here is your horoscope for December 10, 2018

ARIES

You are likely to rebel against domination by people in control in the work area today. Personal relationships are sensitive for a time as both partners seek independence and appreciation. Rather than control others, take this time to transform and heal yourself. Lucky number 2. Colour red.

TAURUS

You are enduring in professional ventures and manage finances, staff and schedules efficiently. You are ingenious and creative when faced with challenging situations today. You are cautious, trustworthy and imperturbable when the going gets tough. Lucky number 17. Colour sandy browns.

GEMINI

You are ambitious and ready to achieve professional goals today! Since you are moody and can swing to extremes easily its best to remain playful rather than be heavy and serious to achieve success and goodwill. Spiritual pursuit and meditation can be rewarding. Lucky number 15. Colour red.

CANCER

It is important to retain harmony by adopting a positive approach since the end of the day brings good news. Health problems should not be neglected. Excesses should be avoided. Be here and now to be happy. Socializing is fun as you meet old and new friends. Lucky number 3. Colour blue.

LEO

You take control and clean up a mess at home or at work with speed and alacrity. Love and romance in personal relationships add to your happiness and satisfaction. You achieve goals by focusing on priorities rather than depleting energy in multifarious activity. Lucky number 9. Colour reds.

VIRGO

Women play significant roles in your life as you turn to the family and emotional roots to stabilize your relationships. You are vulnerable and need to assess people and situations with your head, as well as, your heart to know the truth and make a decision. Lucky number 15. Colour gold.

LIBRA

You release mental stress to achieve a happy and balanced lifestyle. Harmony at home and synergy at work allow you to share your wisdom, expertise and achieve important goals. You are ready to meditate and instill some loving energy in a romantic involvement. Lucky number 2. Colour red.

SCORPIO

Beware of getting led away by enthusiasm as opportunities and people appeal to you. Trust your intuition in situations to do with loved ones. Partnerships and collaborations work well as you have support, space and freedom therein. Women play significant roles. Lucky number 2. Colour blue.

SAGITTARIUS

You mediate effectively in a family conflict with the older members on one side and the young ones on the other. You are generous and giving in personal relationships. Your roots are deep in ‘the tree of life’ formation and you value old friendships. Lucky number 10. Colour rusty red.

CAPRICORN

You are youthful, beautiful and strong like ‘The Princess of Pentacles’ with a passion for life! You are giving in personal relationships. You are creative and diligent in professional ventures, earthy matters, financial transactions and practical details. Lucky number 14. Colour green.

AQUARIUS

A laid-back time will allow you to review professional opportunities and personal relationships. As you see the truth in all its reality, your priorities and values will be transformed. You learn hard lessons from life and then lovingly teach them to others. Lucky number 8. Colour blue.

PISCES

Expectations can bring disappointment so take life as it comes and go with the flow. Don’t wait for appreciation but treat it as a gift when it comes in personal or professional aspects. Don’t forget that freedom is more important to you than any commitment. Lucky number 5. Colour red.

[“source=indiatoday]

Dehydration can affect your brain, make it tough to perform simple tasks

Dehydration,Health,Wellness

According to a recent study, dehydration alters the human brain shape and activity and even slackens task performance. A Georgia Institute of Technology study suggests that when dehydration strikes, part of the brain can swell, neural signalling can intensify, and doing monotonous tasks can get harder.

The researchers also found that even without dehydration, exertion and heat put a dent in test subjects’ performance, but water loss made the dent about twice as deep. “We wanted to tease out whether exercise and heat stress alone have an impact on your cognitive function and study the effect of dehydration on top of that,” said Mindy Millard-Stafford, the study’s principal investigator.

In the experiments, when participants exercised, sweated and drank water, fluid-filled spaces called ventricles in the centre of their brains contracted. But with exertion plus dehydration, the ventricles did the opposite; they expanded. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed the differences. Oddly, the ventricle expansion in dehydrated test subjects may not have had much to do with their deeper slumps in task performance.

“The structural changes were remarkably consistent across individuals,” said Millard-Stafford. “But performance differences in the tasks could not be explained by changes in the size of those brain areas.”

“The areas in the brain required for doing the task appeared to activate more intensely than before, and also, areas lit up that were not necessarily involved in completing the task,” said the study’s first author Matt Wittbrodt. “We think the latter may be in response to the physiological state: the body signalling, ‘I’m dehydrated’.”

The task the subjects completed was mindless and repetitive. For 20 straight minutes, they were expected to punch a button every time a yellow square appeared on a monitor. Sometimes, the square appeared in a regular pattern, and sometimes it appeared randomly. The task was dull for a reason.

“It helped us to avoid the cognitive complexity behind elaborate tasks and strip cognition down to simple motor output,” Wittbrodt said. “It was designed to hit essential neural processing one would use to make straightforward, repetitive movements.” The study has been published in Physiological Reports.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

5 exercises to improve your vision naturally and relieve eye strain

Eye exercise,Health,Wellness

If you day starts and ends with poring over small type on your smartphone/computer, then you may soon suffer from eye fatigue and eye diseases. In addition to this, smartphones also emit harmful blue light that can even speed up blindness. But there is a lot that can be done to boost your eyesight, including certain helpful exercises and diet modifications.

Eating right can make a lot of difference to your eyesight. Opt for antioxidant-rich foods such as leafy greens, egg yolks, yellow pepper, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, and carrots. Yellow and green vegetables are also helpful in preventing macular generation, which can go on to cause of blindness. Also, include fish in your diet as it is rich in fatty acids, and foods rich in sulphur such as garlic and onions that prevent cataract formation.

Here are 5 exercises for healthy eyes and better eyesight:

* Palming is a helpful exercise that can relieve eye stress and boost eyesight. Rub your palms together to generate heat, and then gently place them against your eyes for a few seconds and repeat 5 times.

* Eye rolling is another beneficial exercise. Start by rolling your eyes a few times in a clockwise direction. Then take a break and roll them in an anti-clockwise direction. Repeat 5 times.

* Refocusing is a good exercise for your eye muscles and is something you can do even at work. At intervals, look away from your screen to the farthest thing/place that you can see. It can be the end of the corridor, the office room or the farthest building you can see from a window. Put your thumb down in front of your eyes, and now focus on the thumb for a few seconds followed by the distant object/place. Repeat 5 times.

* Blinking exercises are also easy to perform and help with eyesight problems. You will need a blank wall and a place to sit. Close your eyes for 2 seconds, then open them and blink rapidly for 5 seconds. Repeat 5 times.

* 20-20-20 rule: If you want 20:20 vision, this exercise can help you. Every 20 minutes, you need to look at something located 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Air pollution, particularly, fine dust major cause of cardiovascular disease

air pollution and diabetes

A study has found that air pollution can lead to cardiovascular diseases. Air pollution, and fine dust, in particular, is responsible for more than four million deaths each year. Almost 60 per cent of deaths occur as a result of heart diseases. The large percentage of deaths from cardiovascular disease has prompted an international group of experts from Germany, England, and the USA to analyse the negative effects of air pollution on vascular function in a review article.

Key research questions focused on components of air pollution (particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide) that are particularly damaging to the cardiovascular system and mechanisms that damage the vessels.

Professor Thomas Münzel said, “We are especially worried about ultrafine dust. These particles have the size of a virus. When ultrafine matter is inhaled, it immediately enters the bloodstream through the lungs, is taken up by the vessels, and causes local inflammation.”

“Ultimately, this causes more atherosclerosis (vascular calcification) and thus leads to more cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarction, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias. Of particular interest is the fact that with regard to the much-discussed diesel exhaust emissions, particulate matter and not nitrogen dioxide (NO2), both of which are produced by burning diesel fuel, have a negative effect on vascular function,” Münzel continued.

“The fine dust particles are chemically formed mainly in the atmosphere from emissions from traffic, industry, and agriculture. In order to achieve low, harmless concentrations, emissions from all these sources need to be reduced,” commented Professor Jos Lelieveld.

The findings have been published in the European Heart Journal.

[“source=thehealthsite”]

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. 4 reasons to never skip it

Breakfast Is The Most Important Meal,Breakfast,Benefits Of Breakfast

Know someone who’s the first one to get on a fad diet? Whether it is intermittent fasting, low carb, high fat, and no carbs at night – you name it and they are the first ones to try it. Well, that person is me.

I feel like I have been on this perennial quest to find out what’s healthy eating really like? With exercise, it is pretty easy. Workout, burn calories and follow a routine that you love. But with food and nutrition, there are way too many options, aspects to consider and obviously not enough clinical evidence of what works.

But if there’s one thing that I’ve realised (after many mistakes) is that breakfast is the indeed the most important meal of the day. You may hear of people who like to skip it or people who can survive on a bowl of fruits, but an ideal breakfast is a lot more than that. When you skip breakfast a number of things happen to your body.

Low energy

Skipping breakfast may work for you for a day, but it is not a sustainable choice. A good breakfast gives you that much needed fuel to function through the day. By skipping it, you’ll likely suffer from a drop in energy – if not on day 1, but definitely by day 7.

Weight

For people following intermittent fasting for weight loss, skipping breakfast helps to maintain their fasting window without compromising on an evening out. But according to a study, when you skip breakfast you’re low on energy and are more likely to crave for fatty foods and crave sugar.

Mood swings

Hangry is indeed a real condition. Opting to not eat breakfast can make you irritable. And if you pick coffee over breakfast to remedy that, you’ll end up with a caffeine high. But once it comes down, you’ll again experience moodiness.

Metabolism

Skipping breakfast can lead to slower metabolism. According to a study, skipping breakfast can increase inflammation. In fact, skipping breakfast or dinner can both have adverse effects.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Pregnant women with heart disease should give birth before 40 weeks

Female heart patients should give birth at no later than 40 weeks gestation, beyond that harm can be caused to the mother, new guidelines by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) recommends.

Besides pre-pregnancy risk assessment and counselling, a delivery plan should be devised at 20-30 weeks, specifying vaginal or caesarean delivery, whether an epidural or forceps will be used, and the duration of hospital stay after delivery, the guidelines said.

“Pregnancy is a risky period for women with heart disease because it puts additional stress on the heart, so the guidelines advise inducing labour or a caesarean section at 40 weeks,” said Jolien Roos-Hesselink, Professor at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

“Beyond 40 weeks, pregnancy has no added benefit for the baby and may even have negative effects,” Roos-Hesselink added.

Heart disease is the main reason women die during pregnancy in western countries, because they have a 100-fold greater risk of death or heart failure than their healthy peers.

An estimated 18-30 per cent of the offsprings have complications and up to 4 per cent of neonates die.

The new guidelines, published in the European Heart Journal, also recommended against in vitro fertilisation (IVF), contraception, and termination of pregnancy for women with heart disease.

It is because IVF often uses high doses of hormones, which increases the risk of thrombosis and heart failure, so women with heart diseases need a cardiologist’s confirmation.

“Since carrying more than one baby puts more stress on the heart, women with heart disease undergoing IVF are strongly advised to transfer a single embryo,” the guidelines said.

While women with heart disease can have a healthy pregnancy, they should be aware of a higher risk of obstetric complications including premature labour, pre-eclampsia, and post-partum bleeding.

Moreover, girls with congenital heart disease should take advice before using contraceptives because some methods are contraindicated in patients with certain types of heart disease, the guidelines noted.

[“source=indiatvnews”]

School Teachers Can Help Increase Physical Activity In Kids

School Teachers Can Help Increase Physical Activity In Kids

Involvement of teachers as participants in school recess — leading games, monitoring play and ensuring conflicts — may boost kid’s physical activity, a new study has found.

Recess is seen by educators and policymakers as a valuable part of a child’s school day, in part because physical activity plays an important role in helping to curb high child obesity rates.

The findings, published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports, suggested that students are more likely to be active and engaged during longer recess periods.

“While recess is often perceived as a break for students and teachers alike, it can also be an opportunity for teachers and students to interact in more informal settings, for teachers to model healthy behaviour and appropriate social skills and for students and teachers to develop stronger relationships,” said lead author William Massey, Assistant Professor at the Oregon State University in the US.

For the study, the team outfitted 146 children in grades 4-6 from seven schools with fitness tracking devices to monitor their physical activity during the school day, including recess.

They examined several variables that affect both a child’s engagement in recess activities and the amount of physical activity they netted during recess periods.

The researchers also observed recess activity for 8,340 students at nine schools and analysed the quality of the recess environment and the students’ engagement in activities.

They found that the average recess period was nearly 23 minutes and that students averaged just under 42 steps per minute during recess. The researchers also found that boys averaged about 10 more steps per minute than girls in each recess period.

Overall, recess contributed to 27 per cent of the students’ daily step count average, even though it made up just 5.6 per cent of the children’s school day. The researchers also found that boys were more engaged in recess than girls.

“This study underscores the importance of a high quality recess experience for children, including the need for adults who are actively engaged with the children on the playground,” Massey noted.

[“source=doctor.ndtv”]

Chemotherapy may lead to early menopause in women with lung cancer

Chemotherapy,Chemotherapy study,Study on Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy may cause acute amenorrhea leading to early menopause in women with lung cancer, according to a new study.

The study is the first to comment on amenorrhea rates in women below 50. It concludes that women with lung cancer, who desire future fertility, should be educated about risks and options before starting treatment.

Premenopausal women with lung cancer may want children and should consult their healthcare providers about options for embryo and oocyte cryopreservation, the gold standard for fertility preservation.

The study included 182 premenopausal women (average age at diagnosis, 43 years). The Mayo Clinic Epidemiology and Genetics of Lung Cancer Research Program surveyed women between 1999 and 2016 at diagnosis and annually thereafter about their menstrual status. Types of lung cancer treatments were recorded, and frequencies of self-reported menopause at each survey were calculated.

The results suggested that chemotherapy for patients with lung cancer increases the risk of the early loss of menses in survivors.

Executive director of NAMS, Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton said, “Although more definitive research is needed, premenopausal women who need chemotherapy for lung cancer appear to have a similar risk of amenorrhea, early menopause, and loss of fertility as premenopausal women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer and lymphoma.”

“I agree that premenopausal patients with lung cancer need to be educated about the risk for chemotherapy-related amenorrhea, menopause issues (hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and bone loss), and the potential loss of fertility before chemotherapy is initiated,” he added.

The full findings are present in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society.

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Cardiovascular diseases, here’s how exposure to toxic metals can affect your heart health

Cardiovascular Health,Toxic Metals,Lead

Exposure to environmental toxic metals such as arsenic, lead, copper, and mercury has become a major global health concern. The metals like arsenic, lead, copper and cadmium are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease.

Arsenic and cadmium, for example, are known carcinogens, but there are increasing suggestions that exposure to toxic metals may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

To investigate further, an international research team, led by Rajiv Chowdhury at the University of Cambridge, reviewed and analysed the results of epidemiological studies that had looked at the association of arsenic, lead, copper, cadmium, and mercury with coronary heart disease, stroke and composite cardiovascular disease.

They identified 37 separate studies published before December 2017 involving almost 350,000 participants. A total of 13,033 coronary heart disease, 4,205 stroke and 15,274 cardiovascular outcomes were reported across the studies.

The studies were designed differently and were of varying quality, but the researchers were able to allow for that in their analysis. Exposure to arsenic was found to be significantly associated with a 23% greater relative risk of coronary heart disease and a 30% greater relative risk of composite cardiovascular disease, but there was no evidence of an association with risk of stroke.

Exposure to cadmium and copper was also associated with increased relative risks of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, while lead and cadmium were associated with an increased relative risk of stroke (63% and 72% respectively).

In contrast, mercury was not found to be associated with cardiovascular risk. The researchers point out that their review was solely based on observational data, which might be affected by unmeasured factors, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions about cause and effect.

Nevertheless, they say their findings “reinforce the (often under-recognised) importance of environmental toxic metals in enhancing global cardiovascular risk, beyond the roles of conventional behavioural risk factors, such as smoking, poor diet and inactivity.”

Furthermore, they say their study highlights the potential need for additional worldwide efforts and strategies “to reduce human exposures even in settings where there is a relatively lower average level of exposure (such as many Western countries).”

[“source=hindustantimes”]

Non-addictive painkiller discovered for fighting opioid crisis

Painkillers,Non addictive painkillers,New painkillers

Scientists have found a non-addictive painkiller to help fight the current opioid crisis, though in an animal model.

Known as AT-121, the new chemical compound has a dual therapeutic action that suppressed the addictive effects of opioids and produced morphine-like analgesic effects in non-human primates.

“In our study, we found AT-121 to be safe and non-addictive, as well as an effective pain medication,” said Mei-Chuan Ko, Ph.D., professor of physiology and pharmacology at the School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

The main objective of this study was to design and test a chemical compound that would work on both the mu opioid receptor, the main component in the most effective prescription painkillers, and the nociceptin receptor, which opposes or blocks the abuse and dependence-related side effects of mu-targeted opioids.

In the study, the researchers observed that AT-121 showed the same level of pain relief as an opioid, but at a 100-times lower dose than morphine. At that dose, it also blunted the addictive effects of oxycodone, a commonly abused prescription drug.

The bifunctional profile of AT-121 not only gave effective pain relief without abuse potential, it also lacked other opioid side-effects that patients typically struggle with, such as itch, respiratory depression, tolerance and dependence.

Next steps include conducting additional preclinical studies to collect more safety data, and then if all goes well, applying to the Food and Drug Administration for approval to begin clinical trials in people, Ko said.

The full findings are present in the journal- Science Translational Medicine.

[“source=hindustantimes”]